Ano’ng Ulam Mo? Week 10

Before we observe Holy Week, “Ano’ng Ulam Mo?” featured some interestingly rich and sumptuous Filipino dishes. Let’s just say I was in a sort of celebratory mood, especially that Monday…

Monday  
Featured dish: Lechon
Lechon is a roasted pork dish served in feasts and other special gatherings. It is recognized as the Filipino national dish, and the world’s best roasted pig (as per Anthony Bourdain).

Tuesday
Featured dish: Bulalo
Bulalo is a specialty soup dish that consists of slowly-cooked beef shanks.  The secret of a great-tasting bulalo is in the meat, bones, and marrow, which enhance the flavor of this dish.
Batangas is known to serve the best bulalo, mainly because the best beef known in the market can be found here.

Wednesday 
Featured dish: Grilled Pusit
There are many different ways all over the world to cook squid.
For example, the Portuguese cook what they call “Lulas Recheadas” or stuffed squid. Spain has what they call “calamares en su tinta” or squid stewed in ink. Koreans, on the other hand, serve squid live and raw as an apppetizer (“san ojingeo”), though it is also served dried or steamed. Indians have “kanava” or squid cooked in different spices, while the Chinese serve them stir-fried.

Thursday 
Featured dish: Laing
Laing is a signature Bicolano dish made with gabi leaves cooked in coconut milk and chili peppers.It is also known as one of the hottest local dishes in the region.

Friday 
Featured dish: Steamed fish fillet
Legendary Filipino musician Heber Bartolome came to our program to try out our feature dish. Fish is one of many dishes one can eat during Holy Week.

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Tune in to “Andar ng mga Balita” every Monday to Friday, 6:30 to 7:30pm on Aksyon TV Channel 41, for your daily dose of news, information, and FOOD! XD

Ano’ng Ulam Mo? Week 9

Looks like our news program,  “Andar ng mga Balita,” is pushing through with its refomat in a short while (hopefully by next Monday, March 26). The good news is that our food segment, “Ano’ng Ulam Mo?” is going to be carried over to the new format.

I’ve been preparing for this reformat for a long time. Working on the food segment for the past nine weeks has been unspeakably hard and exciting, but now that I look back, it’s been satisfying.

In any case, the next edition of our food segment, which will be named “Ano’ng Ulam N’yo?” will showcase more food trivia, more dinner ideas, and definitely more delicious food! By the way, “Ano’ng Ulam N’yo?” will focus more on Filipino and Filipino-style food.

Monday  
Featured dish: Yang Chow Fried Rice
Yang Chow Fried Rice is a popular fried rice variety in the Philippines. This dish typically consists of char siu (barbecued pork), shrimp, spring onions, egg yolks, peas, carrots, and soy sauce; though other ingredients may be added. 
Incidentally, Yang Chow Fried Rice did not originate from China’s Yangzhou City. The recipe was invented during the Qing Dynasty by Yi Bingshou, the regional magistrate of Yangzhou.

Tuesday
Featured dish: Beef Pares
While considered as street food, beef pares is a popular dish, especially among budget-conscious Filipinos. The word “pares” is Filipino for “pair,” and beef pares is always paired with fried rice. The best part of this dish is the beef gravy, made rich by the beef meat and broth.

Wednesday 
Featured dish: Adobong Kangkong
Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica) is a commonly grown leaf vegetable that is used extensively in Asian cuisine. It is usually stir-fried with meat, seafood, or other spices, and served as an appetizer or main vegetable dish.

Thursday 
Featured dish: Siomai (shumai)
Siomai (shumai) is a popular type of dumpling in the Philippines. Pork, beef, or shrimp are commonly used as fillings along with minced vegetables and spices.
The Philippine siomai is based on the Cantonese siomai, which consists primarily of ground pork. The Japanese siomai served here is not really Japanese by origin; their version uses meat paste instead of ground meat. Indonesians also have their own version of siomai, though it is stuffed with fish, potatoes, tofu, and hard-boiled egg.

Friday 
Featured dish: Shrimp tempura
Believe it or not, tempura is not entirely a Japanese invention. Tempura was introduced to Japan in the mid-sixteenth century by Portuguese Jesuits. The name itself is believed to come from one of three sources: the Latin word “tempora” (pertaining to holy days when eating meat is not allowed), the Portuguese words “temperar” (to cook) and “tempero” (cookery), or “templo” (temple or church).
To make tempura, prepare a light batter made of cold water and wheat flour. (Eggs, spices, or oil may be added.) Dip shrimps, prawns, or your vegetable of choice in the batter until they are thoroughly coated, then deep-fry for about a minute or until fluffy and golden-brown. 

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Tune in to “Andar ng mga Balita” every Monday to Friday, 6:30 to 7:30pm on Aksyon TV Channel 41, for your daily dose of news, information, and FOOD! XD

Ano’ng Ulam Mo? Week 8

On this edition of “Andar ng mga Balita”‘s food segment, “Ano’ng Ulam Mo?”, we’re featuring more dishes that you can enjoy on a summer night, and then some. Just because it’s summer and it’s hot and humid outside doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the stuff you like. Now that I think about it, I was pretty much in a feasting mood this past week. I feel like I gained pounds…

Monday 
Featured dish: Shawarma
Shawarma is not only the name of the sandwich wrap, but also the method of cooking its meat. Lamb, goat, chicken, turkey, beef, or mixed meats are placed on a spit and roasted, after which cooked parts of the meat are then shaved off. It is served with vegetables and various dressings such as garlic sauce. Shawarma may also be served on top of rice.
The shawarma industry became famous in the Philippines in the 1980’s.

Tuesday
Featured dish: Batchoy
La Paz Batchoy, a Chinese-inspired noodle dish, is the star of Ilonggo cuisine.
Folk history tells us that batchoy originated in the kitchen of Federico Guillergan Jr., a restaurateur from La Paz, Iloilo, in 1938. It consists of egg noodles, meats such as pork and chicken, pork cracklings (chicharon), and vegetables. One who travels to Iloilo must not miss the chance of tasting La Paz Batchoy. 

Wednesday 
Featured dish: Calamares
Calamares is named after “calamari,” the blanket term for Mediterranean dishes that involve the use of squid. Fried calamari is the most popular among these dishes.
Calamares consists of batter-coated, deep fried squid served plain, with salt and lemon or sauces on the side.

Thursday 
Featured dish: Buffalo wings
The recipe for buffalo wings was created by restaurant owners Teresa and Frank Bellissimo of Buffalo City, New York in 1964. Their restaurant is now considered the birthplace of buffalo wings.
To make bufallo wings, chicken wings are typically marinated in hot sauce and margarine/butter. They are then deep-fried, coasted with seasoning or sauce, and baked.

Friday 
Featured dish: Chicken curry
“Curry” is the term for a wide variety of Southeast Asian dishes (i.e. Indian, Pakistani, or Thai) that use complex combinations of powdered spices and herbs, including chili peppers.
Chicken curry served in the Philippines is called “wet” curry, as the dish is stewed on curry powder mixed with significant amounts of sauce or gravy. Ours is cooked with coconut milk.

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Tune in to “Andar ng mga Balita” every Monday to Friday, 6:30 to 7:30pm on Aksyon TV Channel 41, for your daily dose of news, information, and FOOD! XD

Ano’ng Ulam Mo? Week 7

Summer’s finally here! This week, “Andar ng mga Balita”‘s food segment, “Ano’ng Ulam Mo?”, features popular summer foods that can cool you down and fill you up. Never mind that the Philippines is still feeling the effects of La Nina, it’s still a good time for a picnic…

Monday 
Featured dish: Halo-halo
Halo-halo, technically called a tropical fruit melange, is the most popular summer snack in the Philippines. A typical glass of halo-halo contains macapuno, sweetened jackfruit, beans, saba (bananas), kaong (sugar palm), sago (tapioca pearl), and evaporated milk. Most servings are topped with ice cream, leche flan, ube jalaya (ube jam), or ice cream.

Tuesday
Featured dish: Chicken Inasal
Chicken inasal is the specialty dish of Bacolod, Negros Occidental. The chicken is marinated slowly with vinegar, soy sauce, and salt; sometimes, other ingredients like garlic, calamansi, ginger, pepper, and Sprite are used to enhance the chicken’s flavor. The meat is brushed with annatto oil while roasting.
Chicken inasal is known for being more flavorful than the usual chicken barbecue. This is best enjoyed with java rice.

Wednesday 
Featured dish: Lumpiang ubod
Lumpiang ubod or fresh spring rolls is one of the dishes we learned from the Chinese. Now known as a specialty of Silay City, Negros Occidental, it is mainly made with ubod (heart of palm) as a filling along with other vegetables and meat or shrimp. It is also served with a thick, sweet-sour sauce.

Thursday 
Featured dish: Clubhouse Sandwich
The sandwich is mainly a European invention, though it is said earlier civilizations have tried putting mean in the middle of two slices of bread. This was popularized by John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, who is said to order food in this manner so as to make it easier for him to eat while gambling. The sandwich was then introduced in the US as dinner fare.
The clubhouse sandwich was invented in New York’s gambling houses in 19th century. A typical clubhouse contains three to four layers of bread, vegetables, meat, and/or eggs.

Friday
Featured dish: Pinoy-style spaghetti
Pasta is a staple in Italian cuisine, but we Filipinos have our own recipe for it.
Italian-style spaghetti is flavored with tomatoes, herbs, olive oil, ground meat, vegetables, and cheese. The result is a semi-sour pasta dish.
The Pinoy style, on the other hand, is richer in color. Sometimes the sauce is made with catsup and ground meat only, giving it a sweet-sour-spicy mix of flavors.

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Tune in to “Andar ng mga Balita” every Monday to Friday, 6:30 to 7:30pm on Aksyon TV Channel 41, for your daily dose of news, information, and FOOD! XD

Ano’ng Ulam Mo? Week 6

I apologize for not posting Week 6 of “Ano’ng Ulam Mo?”earlier. We’re pretty much on the way to the relaunching of “Andar ng mga Balita,” and at the same time I was working on a lot of things.

We had a few guests for the program’s interview portion last week, so aside from other rainy day foods, we also had a few special dishes lined up.

Monday
Featured dish: Dinuguan
Dinuguan is one of many kinds of blood-based dishes all over the world. It consists of pork or beef blood, meat and/or offal. While eaten as a main dish, dinuguan is best known as a snack along with puto (rice cakes). These are always paired together because the thick, sour taste of the dinuguan complements the puto’s soft texture and sweet taste.

Tuesday
Featured dish: Lomi
Lomi is a specialty noodle dish of Lipa, Batangas, though many versions of this exist all over the province. This hot, filling soup dish consists of egg noodles. soup stock, cassava flour, meat of choice, and egg.

Wednesday 
Featured dish: Chicken sopas
Chicken sopas was invented by the Spaniards, but it has become a favorite Filipino rainy day dish and comfort food.

Thursday 
Featured dish:  Kare-kare
One of Filipino cuisine’s signature dishes. Its origin is unclear; the Kapampangans are known to have invented the kare-kare, though the ancients Moros of Mindanao are said to have enjoyed the dish. Beef, pork, oxtail, goat, or seafood are usually used for kare-kare. The best part of the dish is its sauce, made thick by peanut sauce or peanut butter, and the bagoong sauce.

Our guest, prosecution spokesman Rep. Sonny Angara, sampled our kare-kare for this episode.

Friday
Featured dish: Sweet and sour fish fillet
The sweet and sour style of cooking was popularized by the Chinese. The sweet and sour sauce consists of sugar or honey mixed with vinegar or soy sauce. More ingredients were eventually added to this sauce to make it more flavorful.

Our guest for the night was Fire Chief Inspector Honee Fritz Alagano, Public Information Services Chief of the Bureau of Fire Protection National Headquarters.

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Tune in to “Andar ng mga Balita” every Monday to Friday, 6:30 to 7:30pm on Aksyon TV Channel 41, for your daily dose of news, information, and FOOD! XD

The Sooo Pinoy Food Tour: Filipino cuisine in a whole new light

All eyes are now on Filipino cuisine, as food critics in the United States express interest in the rising popularity of native dishes. Our delicacies, formerly confined to “lutong bahay” and specialty shops, has now found its way to high-end restaurants and food tours, and gaining the nod of foodies all over the world.

With interest in Filipino cuisine now running high, it’s time for us to become just as intimately familiar with our own native delicacies. Enjoying Filipino food with the family is easier than you think, with restaurants creating new ways to improve and popularize dishes we know and love.

That’s why we’re joining Sooo Pinoy for a quick tour around certain spots in the metropolis where we can enjoy Filipino cuisine in a whole new light.

Krocodile Grille

Sisig lovers will surely enjoy Krocodile Grille’s lengua sisig, ox tongue cooked just like everyone’s favorite sizzling pork dish. Surprise your taste buds with this meaty, creamy twist to sisig, with hints of spicy chili in between bites. Whether as a main course, appetizer, or beermate, lengua sisig is one dish that will make you come back for more.

The Krocodile Way goes beyond your ordinary home-made fried chicken. Tender and tasty at the same time, this chicken dish has been marinated and cooked in a way that locks its flavors inside and out. This is a perfect companion to your family’s Krocodile Grille feast.

Krocodile Grille
3/F Greenbelt 3, Esperanza St., Ayala Center
Makati City, Metro Manila

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Sentro 1771

Sentro’s best seller, corned beef sinigang, is your favorite beef soup taken to the next level. The secret is the salt-cured beef short ribs served in sinigang broth prepared to your taste, the result of which is a lightly sour-salty-beefy stew. Best served hot with rice, this is a filling and satisfying sinigang dish cooked just the way you hope it to be.

Not to be outdone is Sentro’s sizzling tofu, your vegetarian twist to sisig. Lightly cooked and seasoned, this tofu is bursting with flavor that goes well with your favorite dishes. Here is one healthy dish that’s truly filling and satisfying.  

Sentro 1771
2/F, Greenbelt 3, Ayala Center
Makati City, Metro Manila

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Fely J’s Kitchen

Beef mechado gets a Kapampangan-style upgrade at Fely J’s Kitchen. The beef tenderloin and pork fat bursts with melt-in-your-mouth goodness, and made more flavorful by stewing it with vegetables and tomato sauce. Meat lovers will feel at home with this classic Filipino beef dish.

If you love your sinigang as sour and as flavorful as it’s meant to be, Fely J’s sinigang is your answer. You’re treated to a heavy, filling bowlful of pork, bangus belly, salmon head, or shrimp simmering in a home-cooked style sour soup (tamarind or guava-based). This dish is definitely meant for sharing.

Fely J’s Kitchen
2/F Greenbelt 5, Legaspi St., Legaspi Village, Ayala Center
Makati City, Metro Manila